John W. Campbell – BRAIN PLUCKER http://www.brainplucker.com THE WONDER PUBLISHING GROUP BLOG Wed, 01 Aug 2012 11:00:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 William Tenn Passes Away http://www.brainplucker.com/william-tenn-passes-away/ Mon, 08 Feb 2010 17:01:35 +0000 http://www.brainplucker.com/?p=1053 Here’s a reposting I did from the Science Fiction Oral History Association (SFOHA.org) website:

One of Science Fiction’s master short story writers, Phil Klass, passed away Sunday, February 7, 2010 at age 89. Phil Klass, who may be better known by the pseudonym William Tenn, wrote more than 60 SF stories. Connie Willis in her introduction to the book Immodest Proposals: The Complete Science Fiction of William Tenn, Volume 1
wrote:

Tenn’s stories are witty, clever, thought-provoking, ironic, intensely intelligent, touching, and hilarious. And too few and far between. Most of the stories in this collection were written in the fifties and sixties, and, until now, have been hard to find. I’m overjoyed that they will all be in print again and all in one place (though it’s also delightful to come across one in an anthology when you least expect it, and have him seduce or surprise or swindle you all over again), But I wish there were more of them.

He was named Author Emeritus by SFWA in 1999. Some of his more famous short stories (and this list is by no means complete) are:

There is an excellent interview (well really it’s a monologue) with Phil Glass AKA William Tenn at Pulpnet.com. It was recorded at PulpCon 35 in 2006. Phil talks about working with John W. Campbell, Horace Gold and Fred Pohl among many others. He certainly had the gift of gab. If you feel saddened at his passing as I do, this recording will bring smile to your face.

Also there’s an another excellent interview from 2004 when he was on WNYC’s Spinning On Air. Which also has him reading his short story On Venus, Have We Got A Rabbi! [via: SFFaudio]

If you have any recordings of William Tenn, we’d love to post them here. Please contact us.

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Free Astounding Stories of Super-Science Magazines http://www.brainplucker.com/free-astounding-stories-of-super-science-magazines/ Thu, 27 Aug 2009 00:09:19 +0000 http://www.brainplucker.com/?p=285 Project Gutenberg has been putting tons of Public Domain books on the web for years now. Well maybe not tons. How much do electrons weigh for over 30,000 books. Anyways, you know what I mean. One thing that is fairly new is the complete issues of Astounding Stories of Super-Science from 1930. There are six complete issues available online. Astounding could arguable be called the greatest SF Magazine ever. Eventually the magazine evolved into Analog, that is still being published today.

But it’s most famous period is from the 1940s when the magazine almost single-handedly created the Golden Age of Science Fiction. John W. Campbell was the long running editor and discovered and/or developed some of the all time great writers of the period, including Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, A.E. Van Vogt, and many, many more.

But I digress… In it’s earliest days, the early 1930s, the SF is Astounding was very pulpy and sometimes very bad, and sometime pretty fun. Harry Bates was Astounding’s first editor and the magazine was going in a different direction than the other SF magazines started by Hugo Gernsback (Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories). Those mags were interested in preaching the gospel of Science to its readers. Astounding started as a “Blood-n-Thunder” pulp with an emphasis on action, and damn the science. There are some very good authors contained in these pages like Edmond Hamilton, Murray Leinster, Hugh B. Cave, Arthur J. Burks, and Miles J. Breuer. Project Gutenberg also included the original interior art, which is a way cool thing to do! So now you can read and enjoy these issues without the pulp smell which sometimes screws up my sinuses.

Click on the images to go to the HTML page of each issue or go here for other formats.

September 1930

September 1930

April 1930

April 1930

August 1930

August 1930

Febuary 1930

Febuary 1930

July 1930

July 1930

March 1930

March 1930

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